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HellBound Hackers | Computer General | OS specific

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FC drive mount on startup.


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Posted on 01-10-07 22:28
I know how to mount and read my ntfs HD but i want to know what i need to do in order for this to happen everytime i start FC. idk what versions have the "save settings" checkbox when u hit logoff but mine DOES NOT.
Thanks in advance
-Tonz


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RE: FC drive mount on startup.


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Posted on 01-10-07 22:36
I'm assuming "FC" is either Fedora Core or another Linux... in which case, putting an entry in the /etc/fstab file will mount the volume at startup. Look at the format in the file and you should be able to determine what to do.



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RE: FC drive mount on startup.


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Posted on 01-10-07 23:09
When I had Fedora Core 6 running, this is what I did to automount my drive on startup. Now, I've upgraded systems repeatedly (yes, even with the BETA releases, and the configuration is still intact). It might be tedious for starters, but it's really easy to setup once you abstract details.

So, here's we go. Simply edit my preferences and settings. And the code should work flawlessly.

- My FC7 is (hd1,0)
- My Win32 (hd0,0)

Install the libraries required for recognizing NTFS partitions
yum install fuse fuse-libs ntfs-3g


Look for the NTFS partition under the devices
/sbin/fdisk -lu /dev/sda | grep ntfs
cd /media (or mount)


Prepare the mount folder for Windows
mkdir win32


Mount the partition (my XP was "sda1", found out from above cmd)
mount /dev/sda1 /media/win32 -t ntfs-3g -r -o umask=0222


FYI [The umask specifies the rights for mounting the partition. In the command above we specified it to be "read-only". Look up the "man pages" to see more options to this.]

This is the auto-mount part (what you're after). Now, as King Zephyr said, edit "fstab" using the command line or any other GUI editor:
vi /etc/fstab


update the /dev/sd** line to point to your partition, I did (I don't remember for sure):

/dev/sda1 /media/win32 ntfs-3g rw, defaults, umask=0000 0 0


This'll give you read and write access to windows. In case you ever wanted to edit files from LINUX itself. Which you'd want anyways. You're a hacker.







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RE: FC drive mount on startup.


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Posted on 01-10-07 23:55
mission accomplished
thank you netfish
I had everything but where and how to edit etc


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RE: FC drive mount on startup.


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Posted on 02-10-07 00:00
Time for some screenshots, now, *chop-chop*
Show what you got.

http://www.hellbo. . .0014#81968

lol, I <3 screenies.


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RE: FC drive mount on startup.


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Posted on 02-10-07 13:29
netfish wrote:
This is the auto-mount part (what you're after). Now, as King Zephyr said, edit "fstab" using the command line or any other GUI editor:


Oh, no, never that... especially not after your kickass explanation. I just gave him the simple answer... you walked him through the whole thing, as only a FC user could do. Wink

Oh, and nice screenies... I think the terminal standalone was the sexiest one of them all. B)

Now for my question, which should keep this thread on-topic: Aren't mounted NTFS drives read-only? Or have newer / different versions of the NTFS drivers overcome that limitation? I always just got in the habit of having a FAT32 part handy...