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HellBound Hackers | Computer General | Networking

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WiFi Question(s)


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Posted on 04-01-09 21:38
Ok, so im connected to one of my neighbors WiiFi. I know its only a matter of time before they realize where all their bandwidth is going.... But my question is: can i hide my connection to their WiFi, so when they look, they dont see that im connected?

And, i realize that eventually, they will put a WEP key or WPA key on their connection, so does anyone know of any good WEP / WPA crackers?
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rex_mundi
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Posted on 05-01-09 00:14
I don't know if you can appear invisible to the computer you're connected to but you can minimize the chances of being noticed .

I know when I've connected to my own neighbours WiFi, I can see their shared folders like Limewire , ITunes etc , in this case the folder was named " Gillian's Music " instantly identifying which neighbour I was connected to , so you should probably make sure you're not sharing anything with your name on it , same thing with your computers name , make sure this doesn't contain anything that can be linked back to you .

As for cracking an encrypted key , you could try aircrack :
www.aircrack-ng.o. . .






Edited by rex_mundi on 05-01-09 00:22
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RE: WiFi Question(s)


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Posted on 05-01-09 00:59
Narc0tiX wrote:
Ok, so im connected to one of my neighbors WiiFi. I know its only a matter of time before they realize where all their bandwidth is going.... But my question is: can i hide my connection to their WiFi, so when they look, they dont see that im connected?

And, i realize that eventually, they will put a WEP key or WPA key on their connection, so does anyone know of any good WEP / WPA crackers?


No, you can't hide yourself. You can, however, change your MAC address. Seeing as the only way they can locate you is through range and MAC address (well...unless you do something stupid on their connection).

Let's see, a good WEP/WPA "cracker" would be aircrack-ng. However, anything besides WEP will take a little bit of knowledge before you should attempt.


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Posted on 05-01-09 01:51
login to the router and see. if the wifi is not passworded,chances are they havent even logged into the router yet


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Posted on 05-01-09 21:56
mambo is right;

the first thing i would do is log in to the router; for obvious reasons;

but also to see if it is password protected.

by default on most routers it will be a blank password, and if this is such the case on your neighbor's wifi then you really shouldn't have any worries.

because if they aren't even tech skilled enough to protect their router then their is almost zero chance of them figuring out wether or not someone is leeching their bandwidth.

and yeah, aircrack-ng is almost the best password breaking software out their for wireless encryption protocols. I would personally recommend you go grab a copy of the backtrack usb iso image and use it!





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Posted on 05-01-09 22:17
Infopirate wrote:
by default on most routers it will be a blank password, and if this is such the case on your neighbor's wifi then you really shouldn't have any worries.

because if they aren't even tech skilled enough to protect their router then their is almost zero chance of them figuring out wether or not someone is leeching their bandwidth.


Watch it. When doing something illegal, like stealing wireless internet, it is always good to be on the safe side. Worry about what you leave behind. Change your MAC address and use a live disc. Shut down when you're done. You also want to make sure that connection information isn't getting stored on your wireless card, as I know some of them do this.

Also, connect to whatever user interface you can on the router and see who made the router. Then check out a default password list. Don't just go in there and start guessing away, otherwise you could raise flags. Not only on just the router, but the isp as well.


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Posted on 06-01-09 03:44
nights_shadow wrote:Let's see, a good WEP/WPA "cracker" would be aircrack-ng. However, anything besides WEP will take a little bit of knowledge before you should attempt.


aircrack-ng is the best.

Cracking WPA is no harder than cracking WEP. Both are simple, the only difference is that you need to dictionary attack the WPA once you've got the 4-way handshake vs straight up cracking the WEP. Both can be easily done in under 10 minutes.


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Posted on 06-01-09 06:37

Cracking WPA is no harder than cracking WEP. Both are simple, the only difference is that you need to dictionary attack the WPA once you've got the 4-way handshake vs straight up cracking the WEP. Both can be easily done in under 10 minutes.


Thank you. forgot to mention that, and I was thinking the same thing earlier.



Watch it. When doing something illegal, like stealing wireless internet, it is always good to be on the safe side. Worry about what you leave behind. Change your MAC address and use a live disc. Shut down when you're done. You also want to make sure that connection information isn't getting stored on your wireless card, as I know some of them do this.

Also, connect to whatever user interface you can on the router and see who made the router. Then check out a default password list. Don't just go in there and start guessing away, otherwise you could raise flags. Not only on just the router, but the isp as well.


also; well, it has already been said to change your mac address, so I didn't think it needed repeated.. :right:

and I am the one who stated backtrack if I recall..:ninja:

and a question.. how the hell is it going to raise flags with an ISP if your trying to guess the password to a router?




Edited by on 06-01-09 06:42
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Posted on 06-01-09 21:38
Sabrewulf wrote:
nights_shadow wrote:Let's see, a good WEP/WPA "cracker" would be aircrack-ng. However, anything besides WEP will take a little bit of knowledge before you should attempt.


aircrack-ng is the best.

Cracking WPA is no harder than cracking WEP. Both are simple, the only difference is that you need to dictionary attack the WPA once you've got the 4-way handshake vs straight up cracking the WEP. Both can be easily done in under 10 minutes.


Not true at all. There are multiple types of attacks out there for the different ciphers of WPA. TKIP can be attacked and the traffic decrypted. However, you must capture certain packets. You're attack, the simple dictionary attack only works under PSK ciphers. You will also typically come across rotating keys if the user is smart enough to implement an appropriate version of WPA.

As for the isp finding out, typically people do not access their router settings. In several routers, failed login attempts get logged and checked if maintainance needs to be done on the router. Also, some ISP's will have flags raised if there are mutliple attempts (I believe 10+ depending on ISP) on their routers. Not saying they are going to act, but if it becomes a problem (as in where something malicious happens) they can go back and help the user.


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Posted on 06-01-09 22:52
nights_shadow wrote:There are multiple types of attacks out there for the different ciphers of WPA. TKIP can be attacked and the traffic decrypted. However, you must capture certain packets. You're attack, the simple dictionary attack only works under PSK ciphers. You will also typically come across rotating keys if the user is smart enough to implement an appropriate version of WPA.


I was referring to the PSK because the OP was wondering what to do if his neighbor decided to protect the AP. I doubt that a neighbor would be running a RADIUS server or any method of implementing WPA other than PSK.


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Posted on 06-01-09 22:57
Ok, so i got access to their router. Dynex. Couldnt really gather much info i didnt already know off it. I got a packet sniffer now. But, i was wondering, how do you put Wireshark into promiscuous mode?
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Posted on 06-01-09 23:31
Narc0tiX wrote:
Ok, so i got access to their router. Dynex. Couldnt really gather much info i didnt already know off it. I got a packet sniffer now. But, i was wondering, how do you put Wireshark into promiscuous mode?


Wireshark will automatically place your card into monitor mode. If you are under linux, please run Wireshark as root. Otherwise you will not have sufficient access to your wireless card. As for Windows, I'm not sure if you need to run it as administrator.


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Posted on 06-01-09 23:35
Sabrewulf wrote:
nights_shadow wrote:There are multiple types of attacks out there for the different ciphers of WPA. TKIP can be attacked and the traffic decrypted. However, you must capture certain packets. You're attack, the simple dictionary attack only works under PSK ciphers. You will also typically come across rotating keys if the user is smart enough to implement an appropriate version of WPA.


I was referring to the PSK because the OP was wondering what to do if his neighbor decided to protect the AP. I doubt that a neighbor would be running a RADIUS server or any method of implementing WPA other than PSK.


That sounds good, but I like to provide sufficient information to anyone reading this forum, not just answer the OP. If you say what you said without clarifying that the attack is good only against pre-shared key ciphers than a person reading this might get the wrong idea about WPA and misinformation could be spread. It's just the way I like to write things.
Please no one take offense to any replies I make.


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Posted on 07-01-09 07:11
As for the isp finding out, typically people do not access their router settings. In several routers, failed login attempts get logged and checked if maintainance needs to be done on the router. Also, some ISP's will have flags raised if there are mutliple attempts (I believe 10+ depending on ISP) on their routers. Not saying they are going to act, but if it becomes a problem (as in where something malicious happens) they can go back and help the user.


typically people do not access their router settings!?!! Shock

I can only pray your right! lmao






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Posted on 07-01-09 08:03
Infopirate wrote:
by default on most routers it will be a blank password, and if this is such the case on your neighbor's wifi then you really shouldn't have any worries.


Just to clarify that(even though you already accessed it I see) I believe many router login's defaults are

User: admin
Pass: password

Not just blank.


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Posted on 07-01-09 12:46
Infopirate wrote:
by default on most routers it will be a blank password

fashizzlepop wrote:
Just to clarify that(even though you already accessed it I see) I believe many router login's defaults are

User: admin
Pass: password

Not just blank.

Agreed. If anything, the username would be blank, not the password.


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Posted on 07-01-09 20:28
i agree fellas.. a typo on my part..

my router doesnt have username, only a password field and it is left blank..

most routers tho will require a user/pass & i agree most default passwords will be passwords. not blank. lol

i'm just referring to mine when i said most.. my fault.