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HellBound Hackers | Computer General | Hacking in general

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CISSP certification


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Posted on 09-10-09 15:30
I understand that the CISSP certification is for the pretty high grade people and such like that, but is it worth it? I know that I am far from being able to even think about applying for it, but is it worth it in the security industry? A friend of mine is about to take the test, and I've been wondering about it.




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RE: CISSP certification


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Posted on 09-10-09 15:41
Of course its worth it. What does the test cost... a few 100$ at most (I actually dont know).

It takes a short while to study for it, and its an additional item to put on a resume if applying for a job. It shows more then your knowledge, it shows that you can work for something. I had the knowledge to do my current job long before I graduated, but it was the piece of paper that got me the interview and job.

Companies care about your motivation, willingness to work, and cooperate culture integration, more then the current knowledge you have (though that's important too).

In your lifetime you should if halfway intelligent make millions of dollars. A 100 here or there is statistically insignificant, but if that certificate gets you even 1 job then it was worth it.





Edited by on 09-10-09 15:43
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RE: CISSP certification


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Posted on 09-10-09 15:54
I know that you have to renew it every three years and pay 85 dollars every time you have to renew it, and it covers ten different areas I think...
If it is ten, then it can add up pretty quick. would there be any certifications I could get that would help build up to it? I know that every certification has different meaning to employers and all, but I'm not sure which ones have enough staying power to be worth it ten years from now. Like C++, Novell, Cisco and things like that, would they be worth to go out and get certifications for later on and mean something? I probably have another 3 years before I'll be able to get a job in the security industry if it's still my career of choice.

I understand that it shows you can work for something, but it won't mean as much if you work for something that is no longer useful... If that makes sense...


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RE: CISSP certification


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Posted on 09-10-09 19:57
stdio wrote:
Of course its worth it. What does the test cost... a few 100$ at most


The test costs about $549.00, not exactly pocket change.

stdio wrote:
It takes a short while to study for it, and its an additional item to put on a resume if applying for a job.


A short amount of time to study 10 domains?!. The CISSP Certification examination consists of 250 multiple-choice questions. Candidates have up to 6 hours to complete the examination.
To me. That is not a short amount of time of studying.


I apologise for the blunt approach but as a computer security student looking into qualifications, i dont take kindly to someone making out like the CISSP is a walk in the park. It is not.

Thats why you need ATLEAST 5 years of industry related experience before you can apply for the exam.

And in regard to other certs. You might want to try the A+ security professional cert. It will ease you in alot easier that CISSP




Edited by on 09-10-09 20:00
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RE: CISSP certification


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Posted on 10-10-09 12:32
mambo wrote:
Thats why you need ATLEAST 5 years of industry related experience before you can apply for the exam.


Slight correction to that mate, you can apply for, and take the exam without 5 years of industry related experience, however, upon completing the exam, you are set as an Associate of (ISC)^2 and notified that you have a maximum of 6 years to earn the required experience, and then once you have submitted your work experience, you will become a CISSP. However Im not sure, but I think 1 year can be waived for having at least a Bachelors Degree in Information Security, and I believe that other certifications can help cut down the required amount of time. Not sure if that is of any help to you.


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Posted on 10-10-09 13:20
mambo wrote:
The test costs about $549.00, not exactly pocket change.

To me 549$ is insignificant if you can use that as a career advancement.

mambo wrote:
A short amount of time to study 10 domains?!. The CISSP Certification examination consists of 250 multiple-choice questions. Candidates have up to 6 hours to complete the examination.
To me. That is not a short amount of time of studying.

I apologise for the blunt approach but as a computer security student looking into qualifications, i dont take kindly to someone making out like the CISSP is a walk in the park. It is not.

Thats why you need ATLEAST 5 years of industry related experience before you can apply for the exam.


Alright it may not be easy. However its still relative. I had to take an FE exam, an 8 hour test, encapsulating 4 yrs of school. I also need 5-6 yrs of related experience to become a PE afterwards, but all in all it was a test that in the future will massively help my career. So the 2months I spent studying for it, is again more than worth it.

I wasn't trying to make it sound like a walk in the park, (though I see how it came out that way), Im saying that if its something that can advance a career, its very easily justifiable.