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Latest Articles

Setting Up A LAN

Arrow Image Setting up Basic Networking in Windows, Linux and MAC



BASIC LOCAL AREA NETWORKING ON WINDOWS 2000/XP

A Local Area Network (or LAN) is a group of computers connected locally via a type of network connection. Common setups for a LAN are through a Hub, Switch or Router to share multiple computers files and internet access.

The easiest way to explain a quick set up of a LAN is using a Hub or Switch. To do this you take Computer A and connect it to the Hub via an Ethernet cable. Once this is done you set up Computer B in the same matter to a different ?port? on the same Hub. Now the computers can see each other. There is still one problem though. They cannot effectively communicate without some further setup on the computer end. This comes in the form of giving the computers each their own IP Address (eg. 10.1.1.1 for Computer A and 10.1.1.2 for Computer B). The IP addess must be different while still staying on the same Subnet (more detail later on this).

If you are using Windows 2000 or later setting up the IP Address is as simple as a few steps. These steps are as follows:

1. Open Control Panel (Start/Control Panel)
2. Open Network Connections Icon
3. Open your Network Card Properties (Right Click on Local Area Connection/Properties)
4. Double Click on Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
5. Give the IP address of Computer A (10.1.1.1) and Computer B (10.1.1.2) to each of the computers so they can now see each other.

Now that your two computers have their IP Addresses they can see each other on the internal network (Intranet). To test this out Open Command Prompt (Start/Run?/cmd) on Computer A. in the Command prompt type in ping 10.1.1.2 and hit return. If you get responses from the host then the computers can communicate and you have made your first step into the large world of Networking.

BASIC LOCAL AREA NETWORKING ON DEBIAN LINUX

A Local Area Network (or LAN) is a group of computers connected locally via a type of network connection. Common setups for a LAN are through a Hub, Switch or Router to share multiple computers files and internet access.

The easiest way to explain a quick set up of a LAN is using a Hub or Switch. To do this you take Computer A and connect it to the Hub via an Ethernet cable. Once this is done you set up Computer B in the same matter to a different ?port? on the same Hub. Now the computers can see each other. There is still one problem though. They cannot effectively communicate without some further setup on the computer end. This comes in the form of giving the computers each their own IP Address (eg. 10.1.1.1 for Computer A and 10.1.1.2 for Computer B). The IP addess must be different while still staying on the same Subnet (more detail later on this).

If you are using Debian Linux setting up the IP Address is as simple as a few steps. These steps are as follows:

1. Using vi (or your favorite text editor) and open the file /etc/network/interface
2. Edit the file to have your settings:

# The primary network interface (Computer A) # The primary network interface (Computer B)
auto eth0 auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static iface eth0 inet static
address 10.1.1.1 address 10.1.1.2
network 10.1.1.0 network 10.1.1.0
netmask 255.255.255.0 netmask 255.255.255.0
broadcast 10.1.1.255 broadcast 10.1.1.255
gateway 10.1.1.1 gateway 10.1.1.1

3. Now run the commands ?ifdown eth0? followed by ?ifup eth0? (Without the Quotations) to restart your Ethernet

Now that your two computers have their IP Addresses they can see each other on the internal network (Intranet). To test this out Open the Terminal on Computer A. In the Terminal type in ping 10.1.1.2 and hit return. If you get responses from the host then the computers can communicate and you have made your first step into the large world of Networking.

BASIC LOCAL AREA NETWORKING ON MAC OS

A Local Area Network (or LAN) is a group of computers connected locally via a type of network connection. Common setups for a LAN are through a Hub, Switch or Router to share multiple computers files and internet access.

The easiest way to explain a quick set up of a LAN is using a Hub or Switch. To do this you take Computer A and connect it to the Hub via an Ethernet cable. Once this is done you set up Computer B in the same matter to a different ?port? on the same Hub. Now the computers can see each other. There is still one problem though. They cannot effectively communicate without some further setup on the computer end. This comes in the form of giving the computers each their own IP Address (eg. 10.1.1.1 for Computer A and 10.1.1.2 for Computer B). The IP addess must be different while still staying on the same Subnet (more detail later on this).

If you are using Mac OS X setting up the IP Address is as simple as a few steps. These steps are as follows:

1. Open System Preferences
2. Open the Network Dialog
3. Input the IP addresses into the given fields (Computer A, 10.1.1.1 and Computer B, 10.1.1.2) and hit Apply Now

Now that your two computers have their IP Addresses they can see each other on the internal network (Intranet). To test this out Open the Terminal on Computer A. In the Terminal type in ping 10.1.1.2 and hit return. If you get responses from the host then the computers can communicate and you have made your first step into the large world of Networking.

Taken from HBHZINE Issue 1, Written by me

Comments

system_meltdownon July 25 2006 - 21:32:55
Nice work dude
cubeman372on July 25 2006 - 21:34:58
I second the motion :happy:
WaTcHeRon July 27 2006 - 12:29:31
Very good!
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